Kalchakra Mandala

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Thangka Painting:


Thangka, paintings of divinities or groups of divinities. These are carried by monks in religious procession and used to illustrate sermons. They are also hung on the walls of temples, monasteries, and in homes. They represent the deities surrounded by groups of lesser deities and scenes from the lives of saints and teachers.

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$60.00

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Data sheet

Height 28 cm
Width 28 cm
Styles Tibetian
Materials Cotton Canavas

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Kalachakra in Yi-dam (god protector) who turns the wheel of life. Kalachakra is the title of a work in one of the division of the Kangyur. It is possible that Kalachakra is a personification of that work. Kalachakra is usually as a Yi-dam with four head on each of which is a third eye. He may have twelve or twenty-four arms but never has more than two legs. In his Yi-dam form he is dark blue. His body is covered by a tiger skin. He wears a belt formed of Vajras. He is always represented stepping to the left on two prostrate personages or demon, with four arms. The personage under the right foot holds a bow and arrow the one under the left a trident and Khatvang. The consort of Kalachakra is called Vishvamata. She is in pratyalidha attitude. She is yellow and has four faces, each of which has three eyes. The other three faces are white, black and red. She has eight arms, four in each side. Her first right hand embraces Kalachakra; her second wields a Vajra hook, her third, a damaru and her fourth, a rosary. The first of her left hands embraces Kalachakra and holds a kapala filled with blood, the second wields a lasso, the third, a lotus and the fourth, a precious jewel. The consort wears a crown and is adorned with five ornaments. She is in union with the deity Kalachakra. -

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Kalchakra Mandala

Kalchakra Mandala

Thangka Painting:


Thangka, paintings of divinities or groups of divinities. These are carried by monks in religious procession and used to illustrate sermons. They are also hung on the walls of temples, monasteries, and in homes. They represent the deities surrounded by groups of lesser deities and scenes from the lives of saints and teachers.